Рубрики
Без рубрики

The End of Cyberspace

On the heels of reading David Weinberger’s piece on unique IDs, a friend sent me a link about VERB Yellowball.

VERB YELLOWBALL is a big, bouncy, world-changing idea that was created to spread play to every kid in America. Here’s the deal. We’re scattering thousands of yellow balls all across the country. It’s up to you to find one, play with it, and most importantly, pass it on. FIND ONE. Someone is bound to pass one to you. Can’t wait? Check out our “Pass It On” section. PLAY WITH IT. However you want. Whenever you want. Just play. WHEN YOU’RE DONE, ENTER THE CODE ON THE BALL AND BLOG YOUR STORY TO THE WORLD.

PASS IT ON. To a friend, or a kid you don’t even know. Pass it as far as you want. If you’re going on a trip, bring it with you. Remember, this is a revolution. And you are the messenger.

It’s a bit like Where’s George, in that part of the point of the game— or meta-game?— is to contribute to a record of the object’s travels, and the system relies on each object having a unique ID that is linked to information about it. Though in this case, the purpose of the records (or the blogs for each ball) seems to be to encourage more use— to get other users to play with the ball.

Not quite things that blog, but things that are blogged.

Not hard to imagine such objects connected to online games— for example, putting objects that have magical properties in a game environment out in the real world.

Technorati Tags: digital-physical, end of cyberspace, games, blogject, sports, unique ID

Рубрики
Без рубрики

The End of Cyberspace

This is just brilliant:

Facebook, Twitter Revolutionizing How Parents Stalk Their College-Aged Kids

[To the tune of The Police, «Every Breath You Take,» from the album Message In A Box: The Complete Recordings (Disc 4) (I give it 4 stars).]

Рубрики
Без рубрики

The End of Cyberspace

Martin Dodge and Rob Kitchen’s 2001 book, The Atlas of Cyberspace, is now available as a free PDF. Of course it’s a huge file, and I still think the book itself is well worth owning, even though I think the concept of an «atlas» of cyberspace enshrines a concept that’s worth challenging.

books, cyberspace, endofcyberspace

Рубрики
Без рубрики

The End of Cyberspace

  • «Most of the foods that are good for your heart are also good for your brain because both need healthy blood vessels and a constant supply of oxygen to function normally. Plus certain foods help protect brain cells and blood vessels and keep those neurotransmitters or brain chemicals firing and sending their signals or messages.»
  • Wild salmon; cacao (not chocolate bars, but the real stuff); matcha (stone-ground Gyokuru green tea powder); acai and blueberries; and coffee beans (though coffee is still pretty good).
  • «The brain is a hungry organ, it’s cells requiring two times the amount of energy than that of other cells in the body. To work well and efficiently throughout the day, this energy level must be kept high enough so not to cause mental stress and exhaustion. So we’ll look at simple ways to keep your brain working effectively throughout your day so your work doesn’t suffer. When the brain doesn’t become stressed it can work continuously so not to sabotage your daily workflow. For this discussion we will assume you work most of the day, morning to evening.»
  • «We know that the foods we eat affect the body. But they may have even more of an influence on how the brain works—it’s general tone and level of energy and how it handles its tasks. Mood, motivation and mental performance are powerfully influenced by diet. The brain is an extremely metabolically active organ, making it a very hungry one, and a picky eater at that. It’s becoming pretty clear in research labs around the country that the right food, or the natural neurochemicals that they contain, can enhance mental capabilities—help you concentrate, tune sensorimotor skills, keep you motivated, magnify memory, speed reaction times, defuse stress, perhaps even prevent brain aging.»
  • several studies have worked out a few ways to help keep your thinking organ in shape, now and as you age.
  • «It’s common to resolve to lose weight, but any sane person dreads a diet’s dulling effect on the brain. In fact, many studies have shown that counting calories, carbs or fat grams, is truly distracting — to the point that it taxes short-term memory. But how we eat can affect our minds at more fundamental levels, too. Here are five things you should know about feeding your brain: «
Рубрики
Без рубрики

The End of Cyberspace

This is just brilliant:

Facebook, Twitter Revolutionizing How Parents Stalk Their College-Aged Kids

[To the tune of The Police, «Every Breath You Take,» from the album Message In A Box: The Complete Recordings (Disc 4) (I give it 4 stars).]

Рубрики
Без рубрики

The End of Cyberspace

  • «Most of the foods that are good for your heart are also good for your brain because both need healthy blood vessels and a constant supply of oxygen to function normally. Plus certain foods help protect brain cells and blood vessels and keep those neurotransmitters or brain chemicals firing and sending their signals or messages.»
  • Wild salmon; cacao (not chocolate bars, but the real stuff); matcha (stone-ground Gyokuru green tea powder); acai and blueberries; and coffee beans (though coffee is still pretty good).
  • «The brain is a hungry organ, it’s cells requiring two times the amount of energy than that of other cells in the body. To work well and efficiently throughout the day, this energy level must be kept high enough so not to cause mental stress and exhaustion. So we’ll look at simple ways to keep your brain working effectively throughout your day so your work doesn’t suffer. When the brain doesn’t become stressed it can work continuously so not to sabotage your daily workflow. For this discussion we will assume you work most of the day, morning to evening.»
  • «We know that the foods we eat affect the body. But they may have even more of an influence on how the brain works—it’s general tone and level of energy and how it handles its tasks. Mood, motivation and mental performance are powerfully influenced by diet. The brain is an extremely metabolically active organ, making it a very hungry one, and a picky eater at that. It’s becoming pretty clear in research labs around the country that the right food, or the natural neurochemicals that they contain, can enhance mental capabilities—help you concentrate, tune sensorimotor skills, keep you motivated, magnify memory, speed reaction times, defuse stress, perhaps even prevent brain aging.»
  • several studies have worked out a few ways to help keep your thinking organ in shape, now and as you age.
  • «It’s common to resolve to lose weight, but any sane person dreads a diet’s dulling effect on the brain. In fact, many studies have shown that counting calories, carbs or fat grams, is truly distracting — to the point that it taxes short-term memory. But how we eat can affect our minds at more fundamental levels, too. Here are five things you should know about feeding your brain: «
Рубрики
Без рубрики

The End of Cyberspace

« August 2009 | Main | October 2009 »

15 posts from September 2009

  • «FutureNovo provides a forum and tools designed to promote foresight and dialog about future technology.» Yet another abortive Web 2.0, wiki-like project. What is about futures that makes us think these things should work? Clearly there’s some desire there, but why do these projects run aground?
  • Look at your computer setup and imagine that you hooked up a 3D printer. Instead of printing on bits of paper this 3D printer makes real, robust, mechanical parts. To give you an idea of how robust, think Lego bricks and you’re in the right area. You could make lots of useful stuff, but interestingly you could also make most of the parts to make another 3D printer. That would be a machine that could copy itself.

Hear, hear:

For almost two decades, when we imagined the future, we imagined ourselves tapped into cyberspace via our deck alongside Case, the protagonist in Neuromancer.

[To the tune of Alban Berg Quartet, «String Quartet Op.132 No.15 in A minor: III. Molto adagio,» from the album Beethoven: The Complete String Quartets (Disc 7) (I give it 5 stars).]

I suppose it was inevitable: coathangr, which describes itself as «social networking for your pants.» Less whimsically, it also says it’s a «social network for sharing fashion advice,» and finding people who share your fashion taste.

It would be interesting to see how the system is used. Does it actually encourages better fashion sense? Is it used maliciously by people giving intentionally bad fashion advice?

On a more serious note, this is a good example of what Jyri Engstrom calls «object-centered sociality:»

the term ‘social networking’ makes little sense if we leave out the objects that mediate the ties between people. Think about the object as the reason why people affiliate with each specific other and not just anyone. For instance, if the object is a job, it will connect me to one set of people whereas a date will link me to a radically different group. This is common sense but unfortunately it’s not included in the image of the network diagram that most people imagine when they hear the term ‘social network.’ The fallacy is to think that social networks are just made up of people. They’re not; social networks consist of people who are connected by a shared object. That’s why many sociologists, especially activity theorists, actor-network theorists and post-ANT people prefer to talk about ‘socio-material networks’, or just ‘activities’ or ‘practices’ (as I do) instead of social networks.

[To the tune of Alban Berg Quartet, «String Quartet Op.132 No.15 in A minor: I. Allegro sostenuto — Allegro,» from the album Beethoven: The Complete String Quartets (Disc 7) (I give it 5 stars).]

I seem to have an article in Disegno industriale 39. I can’t read it, but it seems to be there. Hooray!

[To the tune of The Police, «When The World Is Running Down, You Make The Best Of What’s Still Around,» from the album Message In A Box: The Complete Recordings (Disc 2) (I give it 3 stars).]